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Imagine that there is a plan to build a new high school in your neighborhood

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Imagine that there is a plan to build a new high school in your neighborhood. Would you favor or oppose building the new School? Use specific examples and reasons to support your opinion.

On the whole, a high school is not a desirable thing to have in one’s neighborhood, for many reasons. A school receives large numbers of students, teachers, and other personnel each day. The school thus increases traffic flow and requires large parking areas. If such areas are inadequate, then residents of the neighborhood may find themselves competing with students for parking. This situation is troublesome and may lead to strong friction between the school and the rest of the community.

Also, high schools may generate many other problems. Students include many anti-social elements such as vandals, who may destroy or deface property in surrounding neighborhoods. Vandalism can reduce property values and require substantial sums for repair. Noise may present another problem. Students, as a rule, do not live in the neighborhood where they attend school, and they consequently believe they may make as much noise as they wish.

More serious problems associated with schools include drugs and alcohol. The drinking culture in high schools makes the behavior of intoxicated students destructive, unpredictable, and possibly violent. Add the influence of drugs to this situation, and a new high school becomes a serious liability to the community, which may have to cope with drug dealers in its midst after a school arrives.

Then there is the threat from gangs. Gang life is a reality of high school, and fights among gangs are not necessarily restricted to the school grounds. These fights may bring injury or even homicide to the neighborhood. No one seriously wishes to find corpses on the street. Even if most high school. students have no involvement with gang violence, gangs- in addition to the other factors listed above are nonetheless a good reason to oppose a new high school. If the school must be built, then put it in some isolated location to minimize its toxic effects.

Some people say that famous people like movie stars get too much attention from the media – television, radio, magazines and newspapers

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Some people say that famous people like movie stars get too much attention from the media – television, radio , magazines and newspapers. Do you agree or disagree with that opinion? Use specific examples and reasons to support your opinion.

Famous people may complain about the close attention the media pay to their private lives. When one seeks and attains fame, however, close scrutiny is unavoidable. Anyone who wishes to avoid widespread notice should never become a celebrity in the first place.

This is because the media capitalize on fascination with celebrities. Articles or programs may explore a famous person’s private life in considerable depth, down to details of his or her diet, reading, and television viewing. A celebrity’s political opinions may become news. If the celebrity is a vegetarian or animal rights advocate, such information may be of international interest. Even a celebrity’s dog or cat may become a celebrity. In short, if one becomes famous, then one becomes famous in every respect. One’s dinner menu may make headlines.

Of course, such attention can become too close for comfort. There is a point where satisfying public curiosity about a celebrity becomes invasion of privacy. Laws exist to discourage invasion of privacy and to deal with it if and when it occurs. Such cases, however, are rare. The mere threat to sue for invasion of privacy is usually enough to make overly inquisitive journalists retreat. On the whole, the media understand when coverage infringes seriously upon a celebrity’s right to privacy.

Even so, it is unreasonable for a famous person to expect the privacy afforded to non-celebrities. Attention is, after all, what most celebrities desire. Thus they are in no position to complain if the media watch them closely.

Some people think we sometimes should do things that we do not like

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Some people think we sometimes should do things that we do not like. Do you agree or disagree with that idea? Use specific examples and reasons to support your opinion.

From time to time, everyone must do something that he or she dislikes, such

as visiting a dentist. Should one, however, go beyond this necessary amount

of unpleasantness, and seek out chores that are difficult, dirty, or

repugnant? The answer is yes. An uninviting task may yield considerable

benefit when undertaken voluntarily, even if the benefit is intangible.

 

For the sake of bodily fitness, many people undergo strenuous and painful

exercises on a daily basis. A runner may push himself to the point of

exhaustion. A weight-lifter’s muscles may ache after a training session. These

experiences may involve great discomfort. Nonetheless, the athlete undergoes

them voluntarily to increase bodily fitness.

 

Also, performing someone else’s unpleasant duties, on a voluntary but

temporary basis, can be highly instructive. Such work gives one a better

understanding of another person’s burdens and can provide a revealing

lesson in human behavior. Working briefly as a cleaning person, for example,

gives one a view of society and the workplace from a vantage point near the

bottom. One’s own job may look different that is, more privileged – after

such an experience.

 

Thus, taking unpleasant duties on oneself voluntarily may be disagreeable

but can be a valuable education as well. If it does nothing else, then at least it

may demonstrate why many people complain about their jobs.

Imagine that there is a plan to build a new motion picture theater in your community

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Imagine that there is a plan to build a new motion picture theater in your community. Do you favor or oppose this plan? Why? Use specific examples and reasons to support your opinion.

There are good reasons to oppose construction of a new theater, in the interest of preserving the neighborhood as a desirable place to live. The theater might bring advantages with it, in the form of increased business for nearby restaurants and shops, but a movie theater, by its very nature, also carries with it serious disadvantages which must be weighed carefully before deciding whether or not the theater should be approved.

One drawback to a theater is the large crowds it will attract. Crowds mean traffic congestion and litter. It costs time and money to deal with these conditions. Streets must be repaired more often, at considerable expense, because of increased traffic. Someone must be assigned to clean up street’s and parking lots.

Then there is the behavior of theatergoers to consider. People having a good time make noise, drink, and generally cause annoyances for people living nearby. These effects are compounded if the theater has special features for teenagers on Friday or Saturday night. Young moviegoers will use this occasion as an excuse for all kinds of reckless behavior, up to and including drug transactions and fights.

The last argument against the theater is to question whether its value as a source of entertainment is significant at all. We live in a time when the traditional movie theater is only one of many options for entertainment. A moviegoer also has a wide range of other choices, television, videos, and cable among them. Those options should satisfy any but the most diversion hungry viewer.

After all, in this movie-saturated environment, is the prospect of a theater just down the street enticing enough to justify all the problems a new theater would bring? The answer is almost certainly no, and the neighborhood is justified in opposing the theater.

 

Imagine that there is a plan to build a big shopping center in your community

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Imagine that there is a plan to build a big shopping center in your community. Do you favor or oppose this plan? Why? Use specific examples and reasons to support your opinion.

Much depends, of course, on the character of the proposed shopping center. A shopping center with upscale stores, catering to a wealthy clientele, probably would be desirable. Shoppers in that category have much disposable income and create few social problems. It is rare for a shopper in a Mercedes to throw trash on one’s lawn. Less affluent shoppers, on the other hand, are more numerous, more likely to visit a typical shopping center, and more given to causing trouble, from litter and noise to serious crime. Probably, then, a large shopping center is not a good idea, and it should be opposed.

Though it may be unpopular to say so, wealthy shoppers are the most beneficial to everyone else. They spend freely. They tend to be orderly and quiet. They respect the rights and property of others and avoid causing disturbance in public. They may have high expectations of businesses and other people, of course, but without such expectations they probably never would have reached the top of the ladder themselves.

None of this is necessarily true of shoppers lower on the economic scale, especially if they are young. Their preferred amusements (to put it politely) involve loud music, litter, and overindulgence in alcohol. In extreme cases, violence and other kinds of crime follow the arrival of a place where such youths gather. The result is inconvenience to the community, at best. Other consequences may include an overall decline in quality of life due to increased crime, a drop in property values (again, due to increased crime). and perhaps even homicide if youth gangs or other violent elements make the shopping center their hangout.

If this attitude toward shoppers and shopping centers is snobbery, then so be it. The fact remains that a large shopping center probably will bring with it more drawbacks than advantages, unless it appeals to a small and well-off category of shoppers. That is why the large shopping center is undesirable.

 

The country is a better place for children to grow up than a large city is

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The country is a better place for children to grow up than a large city is. Do you agree or disagree with that statement? Use specific examples and reasons your answers.

Having lived in both the country and the city, I am inclined to favor the city as a place to raise children. Not every city, of course, is equally desirable. Some cities are extremely dangerous, whereas others are relatively safe and pleasant. On the whole, however, I think the advantage rests with the cities, for several reasons.

Although the city is often criticized for its crime rate, there is also a certain security in living in a city. If a child gets into trouble, there is often some source of help nearby, such as a police station or a public information desk. Such assistance is not readily available in the country, where one is relatively isolated and must rely on one’s own resources when emergencies arise. Here is a hypothetical example. Your small child suddenly falls ill. In which place is medical care more easily available: the country, many kilometers from the nearest hospital or clinic, or a city, where a hospital emergency room may be only a few seconds away? In such a case, the city clearly is preferable.

Urban dangers such as traffic are often emphasized, but it is seldom pointed out that rural areas have their particular dangers too. A child playing beside a lake may fall in and drown. Wild animals present a certain threat as well. It is a mistake to think that the country is necessarily safer than the city merely because the dangers in rural areas are more “natural.” A threat is a threat, wherever it may occur.

In short, a child in the country may grow up with an appreciation of birds. flowers, and trees but miss priceless cultural opportunities available in cities. My choice would be the city. It may have its ugly aspects, but on the whole its advantages outweigh them.

There is a proposal to build a new restaurant in your neighborhood

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There is a proposal to build a new restaurant in your neighborhood. Do you favor or oppose this proposal? why? Use specific examples and reasons to explain your answer.

 A good restaurant is an asset to a neighborhood. If the quality of food and service is high, then a restaurant may be a greater local attraction than a monument, museum, or park. In some communities, a fine restaurant, or even a merely good restaurant serving interesting foods in a comfortable atmosphere, is the main reason to visit there. A restaurant may make the reputation of a town or neighborhood. That is why a high-quality restaurant is something to encourage.

Other reasons for supporting a good restaurant include the beneficial influence of competition. When a quality restaurant opens and is successful. it has the effect of spurring other restaurants to upgrade their cooking and service as well, so as to compete. The result is an overall improvement in dining. Thus, a community’s restaurants and their patrons all benefit from the opening of a good restaurant. One restaurant’s success can be felt everywhere.

Also, a good restaurant offers more than just an enjoyable meal. It becomes a social center as well. Many business people conduct meetings over meals. When a restaurant provides an agreeable place to meet, it becomes something of a corporate center. In this respect, a quality restaurant provides a valuable service, even as it benefits from the reputation of a place where deals are made.

Then there is the sheer pleasure of enjoying well-prepared, succulent food in comfortable surroundings. Benefits like this are intangible but still tremendous, and only a well-run restaurant can provide them. Something about a restaurant both relaxes and stimulates the mind. Designed, built and operated in the right way, a good restaurant will contribute much to a community and should be supported.

Universities should provide as much money for sports programs as for their libraries

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Universities should provide as much money for sports programs as for their libraries. Do you agree or disagree with that view? Use specific examples and reasons to explain you answer.

The library is, to use a cliche, the heart of the university. Its Information resources must support research on thousands of topics and instruction in thousands more. All this costs money. Should sports activities assume greater importance than a library, and deprive it of funding? The answer must be no.

Of course, advocates of a well-funded sports program may argue that it is needed to attract contributions from alumni. To a point, that is true. A successful athletic team provides effective publicity and creates an image of vitality and ability. Alumni may be encouraged to contribute to a school which is notably successful in football or basketball. It must be remembered. however, that success in sports is short-lived and unpredictable. A team may have a winning season, but future success in sports cannot be guaranteed. however much the school may spend on athletics.

A well-stocked and well-maintained library, on the other hand, generates predictable and sustained benefits, by ensuring a ready supply of the universal resource: information. We often hear that we live in an “information society.” That is another way of saying that success and prosperity are built on information. Much of that information comes from college and university libraries.

That is why investment in a university library is far more important, in the long run, than support for even the most successful athletic team. Emphasize library funding. That is where the payoff lies.

Success is due only to hard work. Luck does not make a person successful or unsuccessful.

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Success is due only to hard work. Luck does not make a person successful or unsuccessful.” Do you agree or disagree with that opinion? Use specific examples and reasons to explain your answer.

This quotation describes an undeniable fact: success is usually the result of long, hard effort to reach a specific goal. Unexpected, favorable events – what most people call “luck” – may help in reaching the goal, but usually are not enough by themselves to ensure success. Determined effort is almost always needed.

For example, celebrities in all ages have emphasized the importance of hard work to success. Inventor Thomas Edison said that success was mostly “perspiration” – that is, hard and steady effort. President Calvin Coolidge said that unrewarded brilliance was commonplace, and that persistence and determination were what mattered.

Also, even when success looks easy or undeserved, usually it is in fact the result of long effort and careful planning. Abraham Lincoln ran for public office unsuccessfully before he was elected president of the United States. Polar explorer Roald Amundsen made sure every detail of his expedition to the South Pole was ready before he actually set out on his ultimately successful journey. Actor Charlie Chaplin had many obscure roles on stage before he became an international film star. None of these people attained success overnight, effortlessly. Their success was the outcome of lengthy. hard work.

To sum up, repeated failures must occur sometimes before one succeeds, or else one must work much longer than seems necessary. That is the price of success. Like anything else worth having, it requires a big investment in time and energy before the desired results arrive; and “luck” is hardly ever the single decisive factor.

Some people say television has left family members unable to communicate with one another

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Some people say television has left family members unable to communicate with one another. Do you agree or disagree with that statement? Use specific examples and reasons to explain your opinion.

Television may not have destroyed communication among friends and family. but television certainly has done considerable harm. It encourages passive attention to images rather than active conversation, and reduces our vocabularies almost to the rudimentary level.

In light of heavy TV viewing, it is instructive to compare the working vocabularies of high school students 30 to 35 years ago with those of high school students today. In the 1960s, students in public schools were expected to know and use words such as “empirical” and “ostensible. it would be surprising to find a student who has even seen such expressions.

Nowhere is the deterioration in communication more apparent than in writing. Rare is the student who can compose a coherent paragraph, sustain a logical argument within it, and avoid gross misspellings and errors in grammar and punctuation. Moreover, what people write and talk about is as important as how they discuss it. Here again, the influence of television is both profound and upsetting. Some people talk almost exclusively about what they have seen on TV. The marriage of a fictional character on a popular TV show will attract the attention of an entire nation.

Of course, it would be a mistake to place the blame for such problems entirely on television. Yet, the rise of “video culture” has accompanied a gross deterioration in verbal communication skills. A generation has grown up without the ability to communicate adequately by word. That is why, in our time, communication among family members and friends is like a bicycle with only one pedal. It may work, but not well.