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Imagine that you could meet a famous athlete or entertainer. Who would you like most to meet, and why?

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Imagine that you could meet a famous athlete or entertainer. Who would you like most to meet, and why? Use specific examples and reasons to explain your answer.

The athlete I would most like to meet would be the late baseball player Babe Ruth. His name is still synonymous with baseball, partly because he was the first “superstar” player. Ruth was an original in many ways, a trailblazer who broke the rules and created a model for later star athletes to follow. Countless mysteries surround any such famous figure. Despite the fact that Ruth has been dead for many years, I sometimes wish there were a chance to ask him a few questions.

For example, who really made Ruth a media superstar? Did his stardom just “happen.” with no particular planning, or did someone guide Ruth to fame through careful publicity? Did he become famous merely because he came along at the right time, when sports fans were seeking a new hero? Also. Ruth was a hero and role model to a generation of young Americans. The whole country watched his every move. Did he feel uncomfortable with fame, or was he indifferent to it? It would be interesting to hear Ruth’s own responses to these questions.

What is more, Ruth’s early life is something of a mystery. There are some unresolved questions about his ancestry. Where exactly did he come from? We know he grew up in Baltimore, but many puzzles surround his origins and his early years. How did a newborn baby like any other grow up to be the Babe? If it were possible, an interview with Babe Ruth might clear up some of these riddles.

 

Imagine that you could travel back in time and meet some famous person in history. Whom you like to meet? 

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Imagine that you could travel back in time and meet some famous person in history. Whom you like to meet?  Use specific examples and reasons to explain your answer.

Literature is full of mysteries. For example, how did Mark Twain emerge so suddenly as a brilliant writer? It has been suggested that he had help, so to speak, from some other author; but from whom? Perhaps the biggest mystery of literature to me, however, is who really wrote Shakespeare’s plays. For that reason, I would like to interview Shakespeare and ask him about the origins of his work.

The first question I would ask Shakespeare might be, “How could any one person have all the learning shown in your plays?” Another question might be, “Isn’t there strong evidence that Francis Bacon had a hand in at least some of your writings?” If such a conversation were possible, how would Shakespeare respond to those questions? Would he become angry? Would he explain patiently? Would he be amused? It is interesting to speculate. because we know so little about Shakespeare himself.

Of course, no conversation like this will ever occur, unless time travel becomes possible someday. What is more, only Shakespeare himself could clear up this mystery about his work. In any case, imagining a talk with Shakespeare is almost as entertaining as reading his plays.

 

Imagine that you could travel back in time and visit some place in the past. Which time and which place would you visit, and why?

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Imagine that you could travel back in time and visit some place in the past. Which time and which place would you visit, and why? Use specific examples and reasons to explain your answer.

If I could go back in time to visit some particular place and era, I probably would choose New York City in the 1940s. The years between 1940 and 1950 were a very attractive time for New York. Visiting New York in that decade might be a very pleasant experience for many reasons.

For example, New York was a reasonably safe city then. The average citizen had much less then to fear from crime on the street. A dollar bought much more then than it does now. The city then was, in large part, identical to the city now. The street layout was the same, and most of the familiar tall buildings were already constructed. Moreover, New York’s intellectual, literary, and cultural life was at its peak then.

Of course, many conveniences of modern life were unavailable in New York during the 1940s. Banks had no automatic teller machines. There was no evening news to watch on television, because TV networks had not arisen yet. Air conditioning was relatively rare, and so the city’s hot, humid summers could be oppressive. There was no Internet. There were no personal computers, either. The word “Netizen” would have been meaningless.

Nonetheless, New York was a vibrant, fascinating place in the 1940s, and I would gladly give up many modern conveniences, at least for a while, in order to visit it at that time.

Imagine that you could study a subject that you have never studied before. Which subject would you choose, and why?

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Imagine that you could study a subject that you have never studied before. Which subject would you choose, and why? Use specific examples and reasons to explain your answer.

My education was deficient in mathematics. When young, I had no liking for math. I studied only what was required to graduate from school. Now, I wish I had more about math. Specifically. I wish I had studied higher mathematics, because so much about it now seems beautiful.

Perhaps most of all, topology – the study of objects’ shapes – fascinates me now. Maybe I am just naive, but it seems fascinating to think that a coffee cup, or a doughnut, or a pair of eyeglasses has a shape with a mathematical description. When I look at an ordinary object like an apple or a tea bag. I wonder what formula a topologist would use to describe it.

Another wonderful study in math is conics. I know almost nothing about conics, either. All I know is that it describes the curves generated by slicing a cone in certain ways. When I see a sliced carrot at a restaurant, I think of conics and wonder how it would describe the form of a particular slice.

The math of things one can see and touch and feel is wonderful, yet a mystery to me. Now I wish I had taken math more seriously in my early years and learned more about it. Therefore, if I had the opportunity to study one more time, I would definitely choose mathematics.

Imagine that you could change one important thing in your hometown. What would you want to change?

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Imagine that you could change one important thing in your hometown. What would you want to change? Use specific examples and reasons to support your answer.

Many people think my hometown is nice. They see a quiet little town by the ocean, and say they would like to live there. My hometown does have advantages that only a small town can possess. There is a sense of community here that one does not find in big cities.

Still, my hometown could use a few changes. Like many small towns, it has small, narrowly limited interests for the most part, making money quickly and easily. At times, everything in my hometown seems devoted to making someone rich, or rather richer. A green field full of flowers becomes the site of an office building or restaurant. A beautiful old home is destroyed to make room for a parking lot. And so on, indefinitely.

This is not to say that business itself is evil, nor that the town must do without development. But in my hometown, “city planning” (when planning occurs at all) seems to be merely an excuse for making fast money. Everything in sight is assigned a monetary value. Would people here put a price on the sunrise and sell it piece by piece, if only they knew how? Sometimes I think they would.

This mentality is what I would change about my hometown. I wish there were some way to persuade people here that a beautiful view, a quaint old home, or even an impressive tree can have a value beyond a sum of money. Is such an attitude a luxury? Not at all. Our town is small, but hardly poor. We could afford to let a few things stand undisturbed merely for their beauty and historical importance.

 

Imagine that a friend of yours has been given a sum of money and plans to spend it all either to buy an automobiles,  or to take a vacation

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Imagine that a friend of yours has been given a sum of money and plans to spend it all either to buy an automobiles,  or to take a vacation. If your friend asked you for advice, what would you say? Compare these two options and explain which one you think is better for your friend. Use specific examples and reasons to explain your answer.

 My own decision would most likely be to take the vacation. A vacation could have both short-term and long-term benefits. Its immediate benefits include relaxation and relief from stress. There are interesting places to visit and beautiful things to be seen, both in one’s own country and abroad. Tour packages offered by travel companies can make foreign travel inexpensive. safe, and enjoyable. Moreover, while abroad, one can gather information and obtain perspectives which may be available nowhere else.

For example, my own travels to other countries have shown me what a pleasant change life in another country can provide. Seoul is safer than Washington, D.C. – so much safer, indeed, that I have chosen to remain in Seoul for the time being. One American writer I know visited the Canary Islands, found that environment much more agreeable than America, and stayed in the islands for an extended visit.

On the other hand, the car could be used for years and would provide convenience of movement over a wide area, but the advantages of a private car would be limited. Also, driving is one of the most stressful activities in daily life. Add to these considerations the long-term expenses of owning and operating a car, from insurance and fuel to repairs and parking fees, and to buy a car does not appear the more attractive option.

Therefore, I would recommend investing in a vacation rather than in a new car. A trip to another country might reveal opportunities one has never even imagined. Such discoveries would supply a better return on investment than a car, and the travel itself would be enjoyable.

Some people think first impression of an individual’s character are usually correct. Other people hesitate to judge a person on first meeting him or her, because they think first impression are misleading. Compare these two options. What view do you support?

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Some people think first impression of an individual’s character are usually correct. Other people hesitate to judge a person on first meeting him or her, because they think first impression are misleading. Compare these two options. What view do you support? Use specific examples and reasons to explain your answer.

It is true that one’s first encounter with a person reveals much about that person, such as his or her level of education, concern for grooming, tastes in clothing and food, and state of health. Still, it is a mistake to judge a person entirely on the basis of first impressions, because such impressions are only partial and therefore may be misleading.

For example, imagine that you have met a certain man for the first time. He is very tall and unattractive, and comes from a remote, rural area. Once described as “the original gorilla,” he has had less than a year of schooling. suffers from depression, has failed in business, and has been defeated in elections for public office. Would such a man ever succeed? He did. This is Abraham Lincoln. 16th President of the United States.

Consider also the following woman. Shy and reclusive, she spends most of her time at home, and in fact seldom leaves her room. Never married, she has a highly active imagination and spends much of her time writing poetry. but only six of her poems have been published in her entire lifetime. This eccentric, obscure woman was Emily Dickinson, who became known after her death as one of America’s greatest poets.

Then there is a man who rose from humble birth to become extremely wealthy and powerful. He dresses well, enjoys good food and drink, and is a patron of the arts, especially opera. His name is Al Capone. He is one of the most notorious gangsters in U.S. history.

All these individuals were more than what they appeared to be. That is why it is a mistake to evaluate a person entirely on the basis of first impressions. Appearance may differ greatly from reality.

Some people enjoy fresh experiences and change in their lives. Other people prefer what they already know, and do not like changes in their lives

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Some people enjoy fresh experiences and change in their lives. Other people prefer what they already know, and do not like changes in their lives. Compare these two attitudes. Which do you favor, and Why?

New experiences can be enjoyable, especially if they involve travel to places never visited before, or exciting activities. Sometimes it can be fun just to get off the subway at a randomly chosen station and see what is in that neighborhood. One may discover a market, store, or park whose existence one had never suspected.

Enjoying such experiences now and then is one thing, but seeking them out on a frequent or even compulsive basis is something else again. Forever running in quest of new experiences is a sign that something is wrong with an individual. The person is never satisfied with his or her present environment and may be seeking an ideal setting that does not exist.

This is not an advisable way to live. Because no place is ever ideal in all respects, it is best to find one reasonably suitable spot, settle down, and spend most of one’s time there. An endless pursuit of the new, however, is apt to become nothing more than an exercise in disappointment, as each new place turns out to have its drawbacks.

This same principle- find one place and settle there applies to other activities as well. Reading a wide variety of books can be enjoyable, but there is no reason to read everything on the shelves, from reference books to romance novels. It is better to become familiar with a few enjoyable and satisfying things than to flit endlessly from topic to topic or place to place, never satisfied and never at rest.

Which kind of friend do you prefer: someone who is much like you, or someone who is different from you? Why?

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Which kind of friend do you prefer: someone who is much like you, or someone who is different from you? Why? Compare the advantages of having these two kinds of friends.

Life becomes restricted and boring when our friends are all just like us. For variety, it is good to be friends with people different from us. They may be from other cities or countries, of different races, or different from us in age, customs, and culture; but their differences from us can make them all the more interesting, and interacting with such people has much to teach us.

For example, making friendships with people from other countries can teach us as much about our own country and culture as about theirs. Possibly, they do some things in a better way than we do, and we can benefit from adopting their customs and methods. Also, they may see us in ways new and unfamiliar to us, so that we can learn to see ourselves from a fresh perspective. In this manner, we may come to see that we, our country, and our culture are not quite what we had imagined. This lesson can be very valuable.

When two different individuals or groups interact in a friendly and tolerant fashion, both are likely to profit from the friendship. This does not mean that one side must approve of everything the other side says and does. Differences in culture or behavior are certain to accompany differences of opinion, tradition, and behavior.

However, if both parties in the relationship are prepared to exercise patience and open-mindedness toward each other, then a highly profitable exchange of ideas and opinions, goods and other commodities is possible. The important principle here is to see differences in their proper perspective, and avoid making minor differences into divisive issues.

Do you think it is better to make plans in detail for activities in your leisure time, or leave free time unplanned?

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Do you think it is better to make plans in detail for activities in your leisure time, or leave free time unplanned? Compare these two views. Use specific examples and reasons to explain your answer.

Some people prefer to plan activities beforehand for their leisure time. They make appointments to play tennis, go hiking, or perform some other activity. There is nothing wrong with setting aside time for leisure activities. There is a certain danger, however, in carrying such planning too far. When one’s leisure time becomes as regimented and regularized as time on the job, leisure can become indistinguishable from work and thus cease to be leisure at all.

Imagine someone who schedules an hour every day for handball. He leaves the office precisely at 1 p.m., arrives at the court at 1:10, plays for exactly 40 minutes, showers and changes clothes, and is back at the office at 2 p.m. – not a minute before, nor later. This kind of order and punctuality makes good use of time. It probably contributes to good health as well. The question is, can time really be called leisure when one marches through it on a rigid. predetermined schedule?

Almost by definition, leisure activity is unplanned activity. Holding oneself to a strict schedule during leisure defeats the purpose of leisure time. Moreover, highly structured leisure is not much fun. To be truly enjoyable, leisure must be unstructured. It should be unpredictable, unplanned, and flexible. When one imposes too much order on leisure, what should be fun, becomes just a different kind of work instead.

This is why free time ought to be truly free. To experience genuine leisure, avoid planning. Instead, allow for the unplanned. Visit an unfamiliar part of town and see what is there. Try doing something you have never done before. You may not make optimum use of every single second; but such freedom is what leisure is about.